Intussusception (medical disorder)

  • intussusception
    volvulusct.png
    an intussuception as seen on ct
    specialtypediatrics, general surgery
    symptomsabdominal pain, vomiting, bloody stool[1]
    complicationsperitonitis, bowel perforation[1]
    usual onsetover days to weeks in a 6 to 18 month old[1]
    causesunknown, lead point[1]
    diagnostic methodmedical imaging[1]
    differential diagnosispyloric stenosis[1]
    treatmentenema, surgery[1]
    medicationdexamethasone[2]

    intussusception is a medical condition in which a part of the intestine folds into the section immediately ahead of it.[1] it typically involves the small bowel and less commonly the large bowel.[1] symptoms include abdominal pain which may come and go, vomiting, abdominal bloating, and bloody stool.[1] it often results in a small bowel obstruction.[1] other complications may include peritonitis or bowel perforation.[1]

    the cause in children is typically unknown; in adults a lead point is sometimes present.[1] risk factors in children include certain infections, diseases like cystic fibrosis, and intestinal polyps.[1] risk factors in adults include endometriosis, bowel adhesions, and intestinal tumors.[1] diagnosis is often supported by medical imaging.[1] in children, ultrasound is preferred while in adults a ct scan is preferred.[1]

    intussusception is an emergency requiring rapid treatment.[1] treatment in children is typically by an enema with surgery used if this is not successful.[1] dexamethasone may decrease the risk of another episode.[2] in adults, surgical removal of part of the bowel is more often required.[1] intussusception occurs more commonly in children than adults.[1] in children, males are more often affected than females.[1] the usual age of occurrence is six to eighteen months old.[1]

  • signs and symptoms
  • cause
  • pathophysiology
  • diagnosis
  • treatment
  • prognosis
  • epidemiology
  • references
  • further reading

Intussusception
VolvulusCT.PNG
An intussuception as seen on CT
SpecialtyPediatrics, general surgery
SymptomsAbdominal pain, vomiting, bloody stool[1]
ComplicationsPeritonitis, bowel perforation[1]
Usual onsetOver days to weeks in a 6 to 18 month old[1]
CausesUnknown, lead point[1]
Diagnostic methodMedical imaging[1]
Differential diagnosisPyloric stenosis[1]
TreatmentEnema, surgery[1]
MedicationDexamethasone[2]

Intussusception is a medical condition in which a part of the intestine folds into the section immediately ahead of it.[1] It typically involves the small bowel and less commonly the large bowel.[1] Symptoms include abdominal pain which may come and go, vomiting, abdominal bloating, and bloody stool.[1] It often results in a small bowel obstruction.[1] Other complications may include peritonitis or bowel perforation.[1]

The cause in children is typically unknown; in adults a lead point is sometimes present.[1] Risk factors in children include certain infections, diseases like cystic fibrosis, and intestinal polyps.[1] Risk factors in adults include endometriosis, bowel adhesions, and intestinal tumors.[1] Diagnosis is often supported by medical imaging.[1] In children, ultrasound is preferred while in adults a CT scan is preferred.[1]

Intussusception is an emergency requiring rapid treatment.[1] Treatment in children is typically by an enema with surgery used if this is not successful.[1] Dexamethasone may decrease the risk of another episode.[2] In adults, surgical removal of part of the bowel is more often required.[1] Intussusception occurs more commonly in children than adults.[1] In children, males are more often affected than females.[1] The usual age of occurrence is six to eighteen months old.[1]